A Wordle View of Computers in Libraries 2009

So, I’m back at home while the Computers in Libraries 2009 conference is wrapping up. On the flight home, I got to thinking about major themes and it struck me that there might be a way to represent the themes visually. Enter wordle. If you aren’t familiar with wordle, you can paste source text or even pass URLs of feeds to a simple web form and get a “wordcloud” of major terms. I thought I might try pasting the Computers in Libraries 2009 program text into wordle. Here’s the wordle representation of cil2009. (I removed some basic noise words like keynote, track A, 11:30, etc.)

 (click on thumbnail for full image)

Not surprising to see “Library”, “Libraries”, “Search” and “Social” as some top terms. But, I am glad to see the terms around the edges making some headway. Terms like “mobile”, “development”, and “innovative” suggest that the profession is moving forward.  One missing term that I’m hearing more and more is “embed” or embedding”. I think it’s an important concept and starts to get at a new mode of library services: embedded library instruction, embedded reference services, embedded library web services in the form of widgets and gadgets, etc. Just my thoughts from a cursory scanning… If you have other thoughts about the cil2009 wordcloud, feel free to leave a comment.


Computers in Libraries 2009

Computers in Libraries starts tomorrow and it’s always a great time. I arrived in DC earlier today from an uneventful flight which is always a good thing.  Met up with Karen Coombs and Michael Sauers for some SuperHappyTerrific sushi and now I’m collecting my thoughts regarding my upcoming workshops and presentation.

Web Services for Libraries (with Karen)
Sunday, March 30 from 1:00PM – 4:00 PM
Delicious for subject guides, Flickr for library displays, YouTube for library orientation …Mashups and APIs (application programming interfaces) are becoming staples of modern web design. Libraries, as repositories of data, have a wealth of information that could be placed within the mashup context. With new tools and scripts available daily, it’s becoming easier and easier to bring pieces of the web together and enable users to find and build new web services with library data. This workshop focuses on what an API is and what it can do, the standard components of web services, how to build a simple mashup with JavaScript, how to work with PHP to consume a web service and create a mashup, what web services and mashups mean for libraries, and how to start consuming and creating web services for your library with available tools and scripts. Come learn how open data standards and a little “know-how” can change your library services. Hear what others are doing and what you can do too. (Participants should be comfortable with HTML markup and have an interest in learning about web scripting and programming.)

Widgets, Gadgets, and Mobie Apps for Libraries (with Karen and Michael)
Sunday, March 30 from 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
As web content continues to grow and the noise-to-signal ratio increases, it has become important for libraries to find ways to get into users’ common web paths: the social networking sites such as Facebook, the web portals such as iGoogle, learning management systems such as Blackboard, even mobile devices such as the iPhone. Our panel of experts looks at creating widgets or gadgets that allow users to have basic library search and browse functions in these new user environments free from the catalog or library website. They demo and teach how to build live applications that provide gateway searching for library journals, books, articles, and much more. Come learn how to play in these new environments and to give users options for searching and consuming library materials in their own learning spaces.

The Portable Library: Going “Atomic” with Library Web Services
Monday, March 30 from 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM
There is an opportunity for libraries to braodcast into our users’ common web paths (like Facebook and iGoogle) and to create mobile library apps that allow users to have basic library search functions in these new user environments.  Live applications from MSU Libraries illustrate: a Google Gadget that allows gateway searching for library journals, books, and articles and a series of OpenSearch plugins that let patrons search library content from within the web browser. Come learn about the simple steps you can take to make these widgets and research tools happen at your library.

Presentation files and handouts for all sessions are available at http://www.lib.montana.edu/~jason/talks.php.

Demos and “Downloadables” for all sessions are available at http://www.lib.montana.edu/~jason/files.php.

I’m also trying to track the official tags and hashtags for the conference.  It’s looking like “#cil2009″ for twitter and “cil2009″ for all other tagging.  See everyone around Crystal City or teh Internets…


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